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uglytraffic
04-21-2004, 11:44 PM
hehe, well! maybe i look pompus for starting a new thread, but the truth is that i really dont have any particular recommndations for authors. but ill try and say some things that are pompus, so no one gets swindled.
-----
I really cant think of any particular books along the same vein (as merilyn tunneshende) that i can readily recommend.
but now that i wrote that sentence, i can kinda think of some related things.

obviously (for friend) there is Carlos Castaneda. and although castaneda had a hand in leading me to merilyns book... when i first read castaneda (last summer) i felt that that the teachings of don juan were particularly geared toward him. which makes sense, because it is told as a narration of his own apprenticeship (if you believe it to be true, which i do). and upon reading Merilyn Tunneshende, i felt she had a much better grasp of what was going on.

so thats that...

there was a Taoist book that i had for a little that i never finished called "Taoist Yoga: Alchemy and Immortality" which is a translation of older taoist writings. but although i believe it had useful information, it was very complicated reading. perhaps because it was like a very precise description of something that is perhaps rather personal or broad.
its hard to explain, which makes me not want to directly recommend it.

then there is Richard Moss. the problem is that ive never read any of his books. but i heard him give a short lecture and it was very wise. the lecture roughly dealt with sexual energy in relation to sex and relationships. and upon actually looking at what books he wrote, it looks like the stuff he talked about in his lecture would be in his book, "The Second Miracle".

hehe, but basically, i never really read book or enjoyed reading until i read Harry Potter back in high school. hehe, then subsequently Lord of the Rings.

but then i also started to read and thoroughly enjoy Kurt Vonnegut books. and Electric Revolution by William S. Burroughs was good too. :)

OH, and i definatly recommend books by Tom Brown Jr. for informational purposes. Particulary his field guides. i recently got his Field Guide to WIlderness Survival and it has great information in it, if your a human living on the earth. along with (most of) his other books.
hehe, the only problem, is that i think he has given into his demons of hubris and anger, which tends to corrupt his spritual message and his actions in this world. but maybe things will brighten sooner or later?

umm, yeah, thats all i can think of. a book is just a small part of everything around you. and although they can push us into other worlds, there is always the matter of the world we were born into that is always infront of us and is filled with treasures.

la de daaa

[Edited on 4-22-2004 by uglytraffic]

Stewart
04-22-2004, 09:08 AM
I just finished Haruki Murakami's The Wind- Up Bird Chronicle, and would totally recommend it.

Everything by Neil Gaiman is pretty awesome. JG Ballard, HP Lovecraft, Truman Capote, William Faulkner, Thomas Pynchon, William Burroughs, Douglas Adams, and Flannery O'Connor are a few authors who I've enjoyed in the last year or two.

JuneSalutesYou
04-22-2004, 02:15 PM
J.G.Ballard... the DROWNED GIANT! THE DROWNED GIANT!

DrinkTeaEatBooks
04-22-2004, 02:28 PM
I read the Great Gatsby last, and thought it was pretty good...
But I'm currently reading Grimm's Complete Fairy Tales - which are just so great! Can't recommend them enough!!!

$
04-22-2004, 08:19 PM
dave eggers and jonathan safran foer will save the world.

ladylamentingonalawnchair
04-23-2004, 08:27 AM
A Night at the Circus by Angela Carter

carlos
04-23-2004, 12:19 PM
Some of my favorite fiction-

The Razors Edge-W. Somerset Maugham
Any Kurt Vonnegut
Siegfried-Harry Mulisch
Any Douglas Coupland(for the record-he tried to kill the term Generation X-please don't hold the term against him) Note-Miss Wyoming isn't as strong as his other books.
Sam the Cat-Matthew Klam(short stories)
Dave Eggers stuff is pretty great too.

sooo much more.......................

[Edited on 4-23-2004 by carlos]

NoHarshChemicals
04-23-2004, 12:46 PM
I'm reading Notes from Underground by Fydor Dostoevsky. Its pretty interesting. Some of my favorites are:
1984 - Orwell
SlaughterHouse Five - Vonnegut
Catcher in the Rye - Salinger
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Dahl
among others

staralfur
04-23-2004, 01:19 PM
has anyone here ever read anything by stephen elliot? i think that's his name - the man who just wrote happy baby. i want an op on him :)

friend
04-27-2004, 01:17 PM
thanks uglytraffic for reccomendations. they are useful. i've read all of castaneda's book's as well as books by his cohorts. i also really like don miguel ruiz and victor sanchez (especially his writings on recapitulation, very helpful). i read a book called "me and the orgone" by an actor whose name escapes me. it had to do with freeing sexual energy and i found it helpful too. i also read a book by tom brown jr that was good, can't remember the title.

i've not read a compelling book recently, and usually when i read a book on subjects like these it gives me a big boost towards a helpful and healing path.

auxiliaryoctopus
04-27-2004, 01:46 PM
Through the Looking Glass- Lewis Caroll

Wind in the Willows- Kenneth Graham

The Sound and the Fury- William Faulkner

The Hobbit-Um, yea

Anything C.S. Lewis wrote (his grocery lists were probably more witty than anything I'll ever write)

I want to get something by Apollonaire does anyone have any suggestions?

esme
04-27-2004, 05:38 PM
borges
calvino
neruda
salinger
gg marquez
kureishi
murakami
gaarder
rushdie
camus
sartre
seth
anderson
wilde


that's about all i read.

ladylamentingonalawnchair
04-28-2004, 12:44 PM
I'm slightly dismayed that none of you read books by women (or, you know, have recommended any).

pepe
04-28-2004, 01:24 PM
At the moment I am reading "Skinny Legs and All' by Tom Robbins. He is entertaining if people like word play/sensual/adventurous/mystery dramas.

carlos
04-28-2004, 01:24 PM
A great female writer is Banana Yoshimoto. Highly recommended.

Stewart
04-29-2004, 10:22 AM
Originally posted by ladylamentingonalawnchair
I'm slightly dismayed that none of you read books by women (or, you know, have recommended any).

Whoa, you're right. Flannery O'Connor is the only female author I can think of off the top of my head I read semi- regularly. Anything you'd recommend me?

esme
04-29-2004, 11:05 AM
simone de beauvoir

tom frost
04-29-2004, 12:34 PM
the most recent thing I read was Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By In America by Barbara Ehrenreich - it was alright, it certainly had it's shortcomings though.

It seems a little weird to me to be concerned about what gender the author of a book happens to be, does it matter?

I like everything I've read by Kurt Vonnegut (although, I enjoy Slaughterhouse 5 the least), some of the standouts in his catalog (for my tastes anyway) are Timequake and Breakfast Of Champions.

I really enjoyed Big Sur by Jack Kerouac, and I'm surprised it isn't given more recognition.

Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury is one of my favorites.

$
04-29-2004, 05:09 PM
Originally posted by ladylamentingonalawnchair
I'm slightly dismayed that none of you read books by women (or, you know, have recommended any).

then, zadie smith - white teeth

MelB
05-04-2004, 04:07 PM
The best book that I have read in a long while would have to be Middlesex by Jeffery Eugenides. I didn't want it to end, it is so beautifully written! I would recommend checking it out.

ladylamentingonalawnchair
05-04-2004, 05:28 PM
I agree, Middlesex was fabulous! I grew up in suburban Detroit, so I liked it even more. Wonderfully written, really interesting, really funny.

newartriotgirl
05-04-2004, 08:10 PM
i don't know if it will help, but i suggest:

1984 by george orwell
brave new world by aldous huxley
the stranger by camus
the bell jar by sylvia plath
the torture garden by octave mirbeau
crime and punishment by dostoyevsky
silas marner by george eliot
perks of being a wallflower by stephen chbosky
rules of attraction by brett easton ellis
american psycho by brett easton ellis
glamorama by brett easton ellis
less than zero by brett easton ellis [yep, i'm a big fan]
the metamorphisis by franz kafka

and if i think of anything else, i'll put it up

newartriotgirl
05-04-2004, 08:12 PM
Originally posted by ladylamentingonalawnchair
I'm slightly dismayed that none of you read books by women (or, you know, have recommended any).


well, if you look above, i've listed george eliot and sylvia plath... they're two great women, aren't they? :)

newartriotgirl
05-04-2004, 08:13 PM
Originally posted by esme
simone de beauvoir

*applauds* how silly of me to forget her. all my years of taking womens studies classes and i forgot tisk tisk

Politician
05-05-2004, 09:41 AM
Fyodor Dostoyevski, Vikram Seth, Louise de Bernieres. Machiavelli is a long misunderstood fellow too :)

newartriotgirl
05-06-2004, 10:22 AM
Originally posted by spiritualdishwasher
What's the definitive Vonnegut? I've been meaning to pick something up by him, but there's just so much. So what would be good for a beginner?

*nods in agreement* i'm wondering the same thing

MelB
05-06-2004, 11:15 AM
Cat's Cradle is my all time favorite Vonnegut book!

tom frost
05-06-2004, 12:08 PM
Originally posted by spiritualdishwasher
What's the definitive Vonnegut? I've been meaning to pick something up by him, but there's just so much. So what would be good for a beginner?

I've read a lot of his stuff, and I would definitely recommend Breakfast of Champions as a good first Vonnegut, then maybe Timequake......

carlos
05-06-2004, 02:49 PM
I'm going to go with Cat's Cradle or Mothernight. God Bless you Dr. Kevorkian is awesome too. I've really loved all his books though.

Politician
05-07-2004, 08:50 AM
Mother Night. If you had to read one Vonnegut book, pick that one, even if Slaughterhouse 5 picked up the more accolades.

stayok
05-07-2004, 04:30 PM
richard brautigan is my favourite author. you should all check him out if you haven't already...he's ace!
his best book is 'so the wind wont blow it all away' it's beautiful it really is.

uglytraffic
05-07-2004, 10:08 PM
i started this post because friend asked for any other book recommendations after i mentioned a book that he already knew and enjoyed... by a woman. in fact, this book could even be classified as femminist. very powerful.
merilyn tunneshende


also. i have more recommendations.
hehehehehe

go here:

http://www.xeeatwelve.com/

the subject matter might seem odd to some, but its very interesting reading.

the end.

dpb
07-20-2004, 10:00 AM
I haven't seen this title mentioned yet: Bangkok 8. Excellent, excellent book. sort of a detective, murder-mystery type of novel except with transvestites, buddhist concepts and lots of other neat thai goodies with lots of twists. I would highly recommended it.

I also saw the Wind up bird chronicles mentioned earlier, and that is also a very fine book. If you like that, I would also recommend you check out murakami's "hard boiled wonderland and the end of the world"

I thought the da vinci code was a decent read. It starts off with so much momentum at the beginning but sort of trails off at the end.

jdvanwijk
07-20-2004, 10:02 AM
Molvania: A Land Untouched By Modern Dentistry by Santo Cilauro.

jdvanwijk
07-20-2004, 10:06 AM
A bit more serious, I just finished "Das Parfum" (The Perfume) by Patrick Suskind and it was great. There's probably a translation available but I don't know if it's any good.

newartriotgirl
07-20-2004, 10:13 PM
Originally posted by DrinkTeaEatBooks
I read the Great Gatsby last, and thought it was pretty good...
But I'm currently reading Grimm's Complete Fairy Tales - which are just so great! Can't recommend them enough!!!

thumbed through this (fairy tales) at waterstones the othe week as i've always wanted a copy of my own... and it's currently awaiting my purchase.. though i've asked a friend to pick it up for me as i'm back in canaduh... only 10 euro... a nice price :)

also, i recommend 'the torture garden' by octave mirbeau.

[Edited on 7-21-2004 by newartriotgirl]

ladylamentingonalawnchair
07-21-2004, 08:56 AM
I just started Phosphor in Dreamland by Rikki Ducornet. Beautiful weird writing.

Stewart
07-21-2004, 09:25 AM
Originally posted by newartriotgirl
[quote][i]
also, i recommend 'the torture garden' by octave mirbeau.


What's Torture Garden about? Looking into it has been in the back of my mind forever, and I've never gotten around to it.

Caligula
07-23-2004, 01:28 AM
Four Zoas by Blake
Complete Works of Jung
Finnegans Wake by Joyce
Ulysses by Joyce
Book of Disquiet by Pessoa
James Joyce by Ellmann
Killing Hope by William Blum
Marriage of Heaven and Hell by Blake
Shakespeare by Bloom
Naked Lunch by Burroughs
Complete Poems by Stevens
Blood Meridian by McCarthy
etc

Some good books.

Plastic_hero
07-23-2004, 03:33 AM
I recently finished "Der steppenwolf" by Herman Hesse, it was absolutely brilliant. His book "Siddharta" is also very good.

I also like Goethe, "The process" by Kafka and Böll also comes to mind. Oh, and Baudelaire! :)

(and I read whichever books I want. I will never read a book, just because the author is female, there must be something else that caught my attention first)

Stewart
07-23-2004, 03:07 PM
Originally posted by Plastic_hero
I recently finished "Der steppenwolf" by Herman Hesse, it was absolutely brilliant. His book "Siddharta" is also very good.

Totally.

icarus
07-26-2004, 04:59 PM
I love Carl Jung.

jdvanwijk
08-19-2004, 03:24 AM
Last week I finished The debt to pleasure by John Lanchester. The first 80 pages or so are tough to get through but when you get into the book it's brilliant. I've now almost finished reading Mr Phillips (also by Lanchester) and while it's not as good as The Debt to pleasure it's a pretty good read nonetheless.

theallnewcarefulmary
08-19-2004, 09:21 AM
once tried finnegans wake, utter tosh in my mind, i mean does anyone really know what the hell he is on about? the only thing i get from that book is a headache...

iain banks - the wasp factory isn't bad, quite dark

always partial to a bit of dr suess as well

jdvanwijk
08-21-2004, 02:11 AM
Originally posted by Half-Handed
I wasn't a huge fan of The Debt to Pleasure but I can definitely recommend Mr Philips which is superb. What a Carve Up! by Jonathan Coe is also particularly fine.

Just finished Mr Phillips and I must up my rating from "pretty good" to "very good". It reminded me a bit of Tati's movie Playtime: at first I found it very underwhelming and stale, but then it somehow gets warmer and much more enjoyable. Still, I was more wowed by The Debt to Pleasure but maybe that's because I can connect to some of the pretentiousjerk-ness of the main character. :D (Though, I don't kill people on a daily basis.) Lanchester's newest novel should be pretty bad. At least, that's what my mom said.

[Edited on 8-21-2004 by jdvanwijk]

birdman
08-21-2004, 09:03 PM
if it makes any one feel better, i have a copy of the second sex on my night shelf. have yet to read it, but i bought it for a quarter from my local library. they were going to toss it. And why were on the topics of books, has any one read any of John Cage's stuff. he appears in like all the e6 bands links, and was just curious if anyone could fill me in on more of the details than the two sentence synopsis from amazon.

birdman
08-21-2004, 09:16 PM
also, Nietzsche,thus spoke zarathustra, is quite good

jdvanwijk
08-22-2004, 02:19 AM
Originally posted by Half-Handed

Originally posted by jdvanwijk
Just finished Mr Phillips and I must up my rating from "pretty good" to "very good". It reminded me a bit of Tati's movie Playtime: at first I found it very underwhelming and stale, but then it somehow gets warmer and much more enjoyable. Still, I was more wowed by The Debt to Pleasure but maybe that's because I can connect to some of the pretentiousjerk-ness of the main character. :D (Though, I don't kill people on a daily basis.) Lanchester's newest novel should be pretty bad. At least, that's what my mom said.



I looked at Lanchester's last novel - I think it might be set in Hong Kong, and nothing about it appealed. I'm particularly interested in getting good book recommendations at the moment because I'm off on holiday later this week and it's always a good time to catch up on reading.

Any suggestions? And not Neitzsche please, I'm on holiday not going to a labour camp.

Right now I'm halfway through Everything is illuminated (Jonathan Safran Foer) and so far I'm really enjoying it. :)

jdvanwijk
08-22-2004, 02:23 AM
Oh, and the "His dark materials" trilogy by Philip Pullman is a pretty good holiday read, though I found The amber spyglass to be a tad boring now and then.

[Edited on 8-22-2004 by jdvanwijk]

airplane
08-22-2004, 03:57 AM
Originally posted by Half-Handed
Any suggestions? And not Neitzsche please, I'm on holiday not going to a labour camp.
italo calvino's "difficult loves" is a nice collection of short stories.. addictive stuff actually.. but very light..


oh, john cage is awesome.. http://www.johncage.info/

[Edited on 8-22-2004 by airplane]

ladylamentingonalawnchair
08-22-2004, 03:04 PM
Originally posted by jdvanwijk
Oh, and the "His dark materials" trilogy by Philip Pullman is a pretty good holiday read, though I found The amber spyglass to be a tad boring now and then.

[Edited on 8-22-2004 by jdvanwijk]

Ooh I love those books (though I agree with you about The Amber Spyglass, he tries to wrap up all the strands of plot at once). Also in the realm of YA fantasy, I love the Sabriel books by Garth Nix, and the Lemony Snicket books, and my new favorite is Owl in Love by Patrice Kindl.

As for adult novels, how about All Over Creation by Ruth Ozeki, which is really funny and interesting and about potatoes and stuff?

William
08-22-2004, 04:07 PM
i'm currently reading "On The Road" (by Jack Kerauac) and I just finished reading "Time Must Have A Stop" (by Aldous Huxley). Both good and recommended.

birdman
08-22-2004, 04:45 PM
i jsut got on the road for my trip to college. I am going to be heading out to Washington on the 17th from Maryland, so i figured that could be the theme for my trip. Unfortuantly, its not going to be some crazy road trip, but same type of thing. so let me know how it goes if you finish before i start.

jdvanwijk
08-23-2004, 03:54 AM
Originally posted by ladylamentingonalawnchair

Originally posted by jdvanwijk
Oh, and the "His dark materials" trilogy by Philip Pullman is a pretty good holiday read, though I found The amber spyglass to be a tad boring now and then.

[Edited on 8-22-2004 by jdvanwijk]

Ooh I love those books (though I agree with you about The Amber Spyglass, he tries to wrap up all the strands of plot at once). Also in the realm of YA fantasy, I love the Sabriel books by Garth Nix, and the Lemony Snicket books, and my new favorite is Owl in Love by Patrice Kindl.

As for adult novels, how about All Over Creation by Ruth Ozeki, which is really funny and interesting and about potatoes and stuff?

Ooooh, that Ruth Ozeki book does sound interesting. Potatoes are king.

ladylamentingonalawnchair
08-23-2004, 02:45 PM
Yeah, it's great. Have you read My Year of Meats?

jdvanwijk
08-24-2004, 05:21 AM
Nope. What's it about? :)

ladylamentingonalawnchair
08-24-2004, 07:39 AM
A woman producing a TV show promoting US beef to Japan.

airplane
08-24-2004, 09:24 AM
"the kiss" by chekov..

DrinkTeaEatBooks
08-24-2004, 09:54 AM
Anne Frank's diary.

jdvanwijk
08-25-2004, 03:42 AM
Finished Everything Is Illuminated. I've got mixed feelings about it: when it's good it's fantastic but some parts are terrible and overdone. Still worth reading though.

Next book: The Man Who Fell In Love With The Moon (Tom Spanbauer)

abstrick
08-25-2004, 02:08 PM
Try "In Watermelon Sugar" by Richard Brautigan. It is a different read.

stayok
08-26-2004, 03:18 AM
i agree! richard brautigan is ace and everyone should read his books.

Christophe dininski
08-30-2004, 01:00 AM
everyone should attempt reading ''Sexing the Cherry' by Jannette Winterson its quite intense very funny and other worldly insightful.

i read it last year its only a short read but it took three times before I was able to ingest some parts. well worth it

ladylamentingonalawnchair
08-30-2004, 06:54 AM
Oh yes, she's wonderful. I like "Written on the Body' a lot.