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    Thread: demo policy

    1. #21
      AndrewSamson's Avatar
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      This just made me :D all morning.

    2. #22
      Seventy72two is offline Senior E6er
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      yeah ill send you a copy of my second album once i finish recording it and releasing my first

    3. #23
      piaptk is offline Senior E6er
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      Some general tips when considering whether to send in demos to labels:

      Most labels are not going to "sign" a band off a demo. First off, to "sign" a band requires money to be invested, so there has to be a track record of that band being relatively profitable... playing shows, drawing people to those shows, selling a fair number of self produced albums, etc. For good labels (unlike mine), releasing records is a BUSINESS. They have to make money to pay for pressing, promo, employees, etc, and to sell records these days requires a band to be active. Sitting around in your moms basement with a 4 track is great, but if you want anyone to take you seriously, you need to be willing to get out and do it yourself. After you've proven that you can do it yourself, THEN someone else might want a piece of your action.

      Most nichey, cult labels like this receive a fair number of demos and I'm willing to bet they don't listen to many. There are four or five boxes of demos next to Calvin's desk at K Records that he has never listened to and never will. They just use the cases for stuff around the office.

      Even I, the tiniest of all vanity labels, get more demos than I can handle. I lsiten to them all as soon as I get back in the car from the post office. And almost all of them are super boring, generic, and totally unoriginal. I've only received one demo that I really liked. For every Leonard Cohen, there are a billion Scott Stapps.

      That being said, here is how to get it noticed (which will only increase your chance of getting "signed" by about .035%):
      Make packaging awesome
      Be really good
      Put in a personal letter, handwritten.
      Follow up. Most places don't want to send you an email just to tell you they don't want to release your music. So, if you really must have that rejection, email them and they might just get back to you.

      Hate to be harsh, but this is a reality. Art (that is reproducible in a digital medium) as a commodity (and therefore as an industry in which someone else will do the work for you) is dead. Long live the independent artist that can take their art into their own hands and be responsible for their own success.
      Last edited by piaptk; 05-10-2011 at 08:43 AM.

    4. #24
      AndrewSamson's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by piaptk View Post
      Some general tips when considering whether to send in demos to labels:

      Most labels are not going to "sign" a band off a demo. First off, to "sign" a band requires money to be invested, so there has to be a track record of that band being relatively profitable... playing shows, drawing people to those shows, selling a fair number of self produced albums, etc. For good labels (unlike mine), releasing records is a BUSINESS. They have to make money to pay for pressing, promo, employees, etc, and to sell records these days requires a band to be active. Sitting around in your moms basement with a 4 track is great, but if you want anyone to take you seriously, you need to be willing to get out and do it yourself. After you've proven that you can do it yourself, THEN someone else might want a piece of your action.

      Most nichey, cult labels like this receive a fair number of demos and I'm willing to bet they don't listen to many. There are four or five boxes of demos next to Calvin's desk at K Records that he has never listened to and never will. They just use the cases for stuff around the office.

      Even I, the tiniest of all vanity labels, get more demos than I can handle. I lsiten to them all as soon as I get back in the car from the post office. And almost all of them are super boring, generic, and totally unoriginal. I've only received one demo that I really liked. For every Leonard Cohen, there are a billion Scott Stapps.

      That being said, here is how to get it noticed (which will only increase your chance of getting "signed" by about .035%):
      Make packaging awesome
      Be really good
      Put in a personal letter, handwritten.
      Follow up. Most places don't want to send you an email just to tell you they don't want to release your music. So, if you really must have that rejection, email them and they might just get back to you.

      Hate to be harsh, but this is a reality. Art (that is reproducible in a digital medium) as a commodity (and therefore as an industry in which someone else will do the work for you) is dead. Long live the independent artist that can take their art into their own hands and be responsible for their own success.
      Thanks, this is actually really helpful!

    5. #25
      Seventy72two is offline Senior E6er
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      Quote Originally Posted by piaptk View Post
      Some general tips when considering whether to send in demos to labels:

      Most labels are not going to "sign" a band off a demo. First off, to "sign" a band requires money to be invested, so there has to be a track record of that band being relatively profitable... playing shows, drawing people to those shows, selling a fair number of self produced albums, etc. For good labels (unlike mine), releasing records is a BUSINESS. They have to make money to pay for pressing, promo, employees, etc, and to sell records these days requires a band to be active. Sitting around in your moms basement with a 4 track is great, but if you want anyone to take you seriously, you need to be willing to get out and do it yourself. After you've proven that you can do it yourself, THEN someone else might want a piece of your action.

      Most nichey, cult labels like this receive a fair number of demos and I'm willing to bet they don't listen to many. There are four or five boxes of demos next to Calvin's desk at K Records that he has never listened to and never will. They just use the cases for stuff around the office.

      Even I, the tiniest of all vanity labels, get more demos than I can handle. I lsiten to them all as soon as I get back in the car from the post office. And almost all of them are super boring, generic, and totally unoriginal. I've only received one demo that I really liked. For every Leonard Cohen, there are a billion Scott Stapps.

      That being said, here is how to get it noticed (which will only increase your chance of getting "signed" by about .035%):
      Make packaging awesome
      Be really good
      Put in a personal letter, handwritten.
      Follow up. Most places don't want to send you an email just to tell you they don't want to release your music. So, if you really must have that rejection, email them and they might just get back to you.

      Hate to be harsh, but this is a reality. Art (that is reproducible in a digital medium) as a commodity (and therefore as an industry in which someone else will do the work for you) is dead. Long live the independent artist that can take their art into their own hands and be responsible for their own success.
      i dont want to be signed, i just want e6 people to hear my music. i enjoy self releasing me and my friends music

    6. #26
      Seventy72two is offline Senior E6er
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      oh also every single thing i do is different. my record store ep is art noise pop, my first album is weirdrock, with a hint of normal rock, blues and ambient, and my second album is gonna have like 40 tracks, but the longer ones are like if coldplay were really indie and lo-fi,and a little more like of montreal.

      so my music isnt generic

    7. #27
      piaptk is offline Senior E6er
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      Quote Originally Posted by Seventy72two View Post
      so my music isnt generic

      You don't have to defend yourself to me. I'm not saying it is. I've never heard it. But, I am also willing to bet that every band that ever sent any label a demo thought they were not generic either. And a lot of them were. God knows all of my bands whren I was young were CERTAIN we were the best thing going. Given the sucked. I'm simply speaking in the abstract to John Doe generic songwriter/home recordist. So, it's up to you to be honest with yourself. Maybe you are the most forward thinking songwriter on the planet, doing things with songwriting that would make Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan give up in disgust, and John Lennon to roll over in his grave because they could never come close to your genius. Or maybe not.

      But also, on the genre bending note, from a BUSINESS perspective, most labels, even artsy indies are looking for a band that has a somewhat uniform and unique sound. If you keep switching styles every album, neither the fan nor the label really know what to do with you. You alienate half your fans that liked what you were doing on the last record, which you totally abandoned on the new one. A few bands have been able to pull it off, but it's definitely the exception, rather than the rule.

      I can only give you general advice based on my perspective from running the label that I run and based on what I have gathered from 15 years of playing music, touring, and releasing records. I know people that work for a LOT of mid-to large size indies and we talk about this stuff a lot.

      It doesn't apply to every band/every label and I never implied it did. It's not personal, it's just a reality check for every young band that thinks they are the best that ever was (and almost every teenager/early twenty something deep down thinks they are an undiscovered genius (and some actually are!))). I've been there, and pretty much every band I've ever known has been there, that is part of the impetus to make music... you've got something to say and think it's important and want to share it, which is awesome! However, you also have to realize that there are a lot of bands out there, and even most of the good ones fade into obscurity. But, Even if a label allows you to send in your demo, I would be realistic with my expectations, and expect absolutely nothing.
      Last edited by piaptk; 05-12-2011 at 01:19 PM.

    8. #28
      Noah's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by piaptk View Post
      Sitting around in your moms basement with a 4 track is great
      I agree.

    9. #29
      piaptk is offline Senior E6er
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      I really don't wanna be a downer, but you guys mostly seem pretty young, so I'm just trying to give you the benefit of a lifetimes experience in recording, promoting, playing, and releasing music. Use it for what you will, and hopefully you can find a way to beat the odds.

    10. #30
      soniclovenoize's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by piaptk View Post
      I really don't wanna be a downer, but you guys mostly seem pretty young, so I'm just trying to give you the benefit of a lifetimes experience in recording, promoting, playing, and releasing music. Use it for what you will, and hopefully you can find a way to beat the odds.
      I don't have a lifetime--only about 15 years--but I've tried giving similar advice here long ago and gave up because they indeed do not want to hear it.
      The Curiously Strong Peppermints (psychedelic-pop) - http://cspm.bandcamp.com
      Mine (psychedelic indie stoner prog) - https://mineminemine.bandcamp.com/

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